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Shazam for Birds Who's Calling Please

You have picked up a bag of Mill Creek Seed Co.’s bird seed from Bird House Nature Company, filled your favourite feeders and while waiting for visitors you are stopped in your tracks with a bird call or song that you are not familiar with. There is an app to assist you in your curiousity. In this email, we will explore one of the many bird identification apps. While reviewing choices, we found one app that kept rising to the top of reviews for IOS and Android users. It is the Merlin Bird ID app created by Cornell University. The app has been known for identifying bird types. The latest version now includes identifying bird sounds along with the bird types....

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Providing A Reliable Source of Water

A reliable known source for birds can make a difference in the amount of visitors you have to your feeders. Birds need water for two reasons: drinking and preening. Water helps keep a bird's body cool both from the inside and outside. Water baths can also remove dust, loose feathers, parasites and other debris from a bird's plumage. If you have or are considering a bird bath for your backyard visitors here are some tips: Shallow is Better:* Keep a level of water in your bird bath to a maximum of 2” in the centre of the bird bath * perfect atmosphere for songbirds to wade in and splash about* If a bird bath basin is deep, place a layer...

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Match Birds to Provinces and Territories

While the discussion of naming a national Canadian bird that represents us all continues, how many of the official birds of our provinces and territories can you name? Alberta: Great Horned Owl (Bubo virginianus) British Columbia: Steller’s Jay (Cyanocitta stelleri) Manitoba: Great Grey Owl (Strix nebulosa) New Brunswick: Black-Capped Chickadee (Poecile atricapillus) Newfoundland and Labrador: Atlantic Puffin (Fratercula arctica) Northwest Territories: Gyrfalcon (Falco rusticolus) Nova Scotia: Osprey (Pandion haliaetus) Nunavut: Rock Ptarmigan (Lagopus muta) Ontario: Common Loon (Gavia immer) Prince Edward Island: Blue Jay (Cyanocitta cristata) Quebec: Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiaca) Saskatchewan: Sharp-Tailed Grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus) Yukon Territory: Common Raven (Corvus corax) Bird House Nature Company is in the process of adding more content to our website blog. We invite you to visit us as we blogaway with tips and resources.  

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Bird Communication

“Are you talking to me?”Bird sounds are unique and differ wildly between species. They can be categorized into calls and songs. BIRD CALLSAlarm Calls* distinct and piercing, usually short but can be heard over long distances* in some instances or for impending great danger, the call can be rapid* purpose is to warn other birds when feeling threatened Flight Calls* heard when birds take flight or are in flight * birds that flock together tend to make flight calls* made when birds want to announce their location to other birds when moving*most often heard during bird migration Begging Calls* these calls are specific to young birds* they come in the form of rasps, chirps and wheezes* intended for parent to hear*...

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Exploring Keystone Species

The term “Keystone Species” was coined in 1969 by ecologist Robert Paine in describing the role of starfish in eating mussels. Starfishes were seen as maintaining key ecosystems or structures of the area through the management of mussel populations. The National Geographic describes a keystone species as “an organism that helps define an entire ecosystem. Without its keystone species, the ecosystem would be dramatically different or cease to exist altogether. This means if the species were to disappear from the ecosystem, no other species would be able to fill its ecological niche."Announcing the arrival of the woodpecker and their unique pecking behaviour that serves more than themselves. They have earned the term master carpenters. In search of food, and a home...

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